Eight Must-See Exhibitions Opening In Philly This Winter

American watercolor, international street art, fashion, frogs and more...

This winter, Philly’s inviting (and warm) museums are offering a number of blockbuster and one-of-a-kind exhibitions that should not be missed.

From photography exploring history-rich Harlem to street art spanning both museum walls and city streets to an exhibition devoted entirely to frogs(!), this winter’s exhibitions cover topics far and wide.

Read on for the top exhibitions to check out this winter.

Dawoud Bey: Harlem, U.S.A. at the African American Museum in Philadelphia

African American MuseumPhoto By: J. Fusco for Visit Philadelphia

Take a photographic journey with Dawoud Bey: Harlem, U.S.A. at The African American Museum in Philadelphia. The exhibition highlights the history-rich neighborhood of Harlem and the diversity of the residents within with 25. The display is African-American photographer Dawoud Bey's first solo exhibition, which originally debuted in 1979 at the Studio Museum in Harlem.

Dawoud Bey: Harlem, U.S.A. at the African American Museum in Philadelphia

When:January 26-April 2
Where:African American Museum in Philadelphia, 701 Arch Street

www.aampmuseum.org

Shawn Theodore: Church of Broken Pieces at The African American Museum in Philadelphia

The African American Museum in PhiladelphiaJ. Fusco For Visit Philadelphia

Another outstanding photo exploration at The African American Museum in Philadelphia, Shawn Theodore: Church of Broken Pieces uses portraits and street photography to tell the story of a contemporary black America in flux. Looking at the successes gained — including free and safe black digital spaces such as Black Twitter as well as the journey black America has taken since Post-Antebellum America, Jim Crow, The Great Migration and the Civil Rights Movement — artist Shawn Theodore seeks to visualize the power of the African-American community.

Shawn Theodore: Church of Broken Pieces at The African American Museum in Philadelphia

When:February 2-April 2
Where:African American Museum in Philadelphia, 701 Arch Street

www.aampmuseum.org

Tracing the Remains at the Mutter Museum

What happens to your organs after death? Tracing the Remains at the Mutter Museum answers this intriguing question. Featuring highly detailed embroidered and crocheted pieces, intricate beadwork, layered drawings and dark, inky backgrounds, the evocative collection takes a fascinating look at what physically takes places after death.

Tracing the Remains at the Mutter Museum

When:January 13-July 6
Where:Mutter Museum, 19 S. 22nd Street

www.muttermuseum.org

Frogs: A Chorus of Colors at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University

Brighten your day with riveting (or should we say "ribbeting") frog-filled information of all kinds in the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University's newest exhibition Frogs: A Chorus of Colors. Find live frogs of every hoppable hue, listen to their colorful chorus and admire the many ways they swim, glide and jump around at this interactive exhibition.

Frogs: A Chorus of Colors at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University

When:February 4-May 14
Where:The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, 1900 Benjamin Franklin Parkway

www.ansp.org

Person of the Crowd: The Contemporary Art of Flanerie at The Barnes Foundation

From guerilla campaigns plastered on street corners to provocatively dressed artists making public spectacles, street art has been used to expose gentrification, gender politics, racism, homelessness and more, and the Barnes Foundation explores this outlet of art in Person of the Crowd. Visitors to the museum will find a collection from 50 international artists while a series of ongoing artist performances will take place at select external locations in the city. And billboards and street posters will make this groundbreaking exhibition truly come to life. 

Person of the Crowd: The Contemporary Art of Flanerie at The Barnes Foundation

When:February 25-May 22
Where:The Barnes Foundation, 2025 Benjamin Franklin Parkway

www.barnesfoundation.org

American Watercolor in the Age of Homer and Sargent at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Photo Courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art

Works from Winslow Homer and John Singer Sargent — two of history's most influential U.S. watercolor artists — head to the Philadelphia Museum of Art in an exhibition that charts the rise and evolution of watercolor in America. Chronicling the medium from 1860, when it was thought of as the domain of "amateurs, women, and commercial artists," to 1925, American Watercolor in the Age of Homer and Sargent is a must-see for all painting enthusiasts.

American Watercolor in the Age of Homer and Sargent at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

When:March 1-May 14
Where:Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2600 Benjamin Franklin Parkway

www.philamuseum.org

1917: How One Year Changed the World at the National Museum of American Jewish History

National Museum of American Jewish HistoryPhoto by M. Kennedy For Visit Philadelphia

In 1917, three key events took place: America's entry into WWI, the Bolshevik Revolution and the signing of the Balfour Declaration when Great Britain indicated support for a Jewish homeland in Palestine. In the National Museum of American Jewish History's newest exhibition, 1917: How One Year Changed the World, visitors get the chance to explore more than 100 original artifacts that create a journey through this historically significant year and examine its impact on American politics and culture today.

1917: How One Year Changed the World at the National Museum of American Jewish History

When:March 17-July 16
Where:National Museum of American Jewish History, 101 S. Independence Mall E.

www.nmajh.org

Charles Sheeler: Fashion, Photography and Structural Form at the Michener Art Museum

This one's for the fashionista, and the photographer, too. Recognized as one of the founding figures of American modernism for his pioneering work as a painter and a photographer, Charles Sheeler takes center stage at the Michener Art Museum this March. On display will be a body of work from Sheeler's robust career, analyzing the fashion-focused photography that he produced for Condé Nast between 1926 and 1931. Critics have dismissed this set of imagery as purely commercial, but the exhibition seeks to prove that Sheeler's work was actually crucial to his artistic development. 

Charles Sheeler: Fashion, Photography and Structural Form at the Michener Art Museum

When:March 18-July 9
Where:Michener Art Museum, 138 S. Pine Street, Doylestown

www.michenermuseum.org

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